Tag: electric vehicles in us

Money Makes the World Go Electric: Why the US Government Should Invest in the Electric Vehicle Industry

Many automakers have agreed that they can no longer step on the gas in building internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. For example, GM, Ford, and Stellantis have urged the federal government to lift the cap in the federal tax credit for EVs, which would help lower EV prices and benefit manufacturers and consumers alike. Several tax credit design changes can “enhance the effectiveness of the federal dollars” to advance automaker interests in producing more electric vehicles.

Read More

Vehicle-to-Grid Standards for EVs in US

Before V2G can be implemented across the country, states will have to navigate the evolving landscape of technical standards that govern the certification of V2G-enabled equipment and integrate these standards into their rules and technical documents. This paper provides the starting point for regulators and other stakeholders to begin that process and unlock the potential of V2G technology on the grid.

Read More

Four New Trends in EV Charging Software and Platforms

Electric vehicle infrastructure is a topic that is constantly in the news, and as the industry continues to rapidly evolve, utilities and charging network operators need to be prepared for the future of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) software and platforms. Kimley-Horn’s Ryan Gram, P.E., recently moderated a REGlobal webinar on the future of EV Charging Software and Platforms. Read on to learn the trends to watch, tips to bring value to your customers and maximize efficiency, and predictions for what’s ahead.

Read More

Major Agreement on Clean Cars Nevada Program Announced

Since Governor Sisolak announced the Clean Cars Nevada initiative in June of 2020, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) has been hard at work developing requirements as part of its Clean Cars Nevada program to expand the availability of electric vehicles, reduce air pollution, and fight climate change. Sixteen other states and the District of Columbia have already adopted or are in the process of adopting clean car programs which, under the Clean Air Act, must be based on California’s requirements. Stakeholders in Nevada, together with the agency, worked for months to resolve key issues, with changes that ultimately provide increased certainty for all parties that the program will be—in practice—neither weaker nor tougher than California’s program as the state phases into the program. The agreement also paves the electric road—so to speak—for organizations to work together on complementary EV programs. 

Read More